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Support Auckland Choral

The fallout from COVID-19 has hit the arts sector particularly heavily, with concerts worldwide cancelled: artists, groups and venues left without any certainty as to their future. For the first time since the influenza epidemic of 1918 (which caused the cancellation of our Elijah & Messiah concerts) we too were forced to cancel our last concert, Haydn’s The Seasons - at significant financial cost.

Now, more than ever, we are seeking donations, gifts in kind, sponsorships and bequests to ensure Auckland Choral can continue its day-to-day operations and performances in the future.

If you or your company would like to support us, please consider donating or becoming a sponsor. Contact Carey McDonald on admin@aucklandchoral.com for more information

 

Auckland Choral is Auckland’s symphonic choir. For its concert series in 2020, it is offering two awards for student compositions - one for secondary school and one for tertiary age students. A prize in each category is offered for the best work, as selected by an adjudicator nominated by the choir’s management committee. The choir will schedule the winning works during 2020.

Competition regulations

1. The work should be written for a symphonic choir (around 100 voices).

2. The work will be for SATB choir (with limited divisi of parts) and organ. Vocal ranges should be suitable for a choir consisting largely of community singers.

3. The duration of the work will be no more than 5 minutes.

4. The work should use a text by a NZ poet or writer. The text should be related to NZ nature, or history, or a specific place in our country. Obtaining copyright permission for the text is the responsibility of the composer.

5. The score should be laid out using conventional choral formatting. Care should be taken with word underlay. In the case of the winning work, the submitted score should be ready for duplication. Composers grant the choir permission to make further copies for performance at no additional fee. 

6. Submitted works should not have been performed or published previously.

7. Copyright on the music is retained by the composer. The composers of the winning works will allow Auckland Choral to present the premiere performance of the pieces. The winning composers will be expected to attend the premiere although no additional financial support is likely to be available for composers attending from outside Auckland.

8. Entries are to be submitted anonymously. The score should have a nom de plume in place of the composer’s name. The score will be submitted electronically (as a PDF file) with an accompanying email giving the title of the work, the nom de plume used on the score, and contact details. An audio file of a computer realisation (MP3 preferred) may also be included with the submission.

9. Composers must be a New Zealand citizen, or normally resident in New Zealand.

10. Two prizes are offered:

(i) one prize of $500 for students currently (2019) enrolled at a secondary school (or if home-schooled, of secondary school age)

(ii) one prize of $750 for tertiary age students with an upper age limit of 26 years as at 31 December 2019

11. The choir reserves the right to make no awards if scores do not reach a satisfactory standard.

12. Deadline for entries is 20 March 2020 (updated date).

13. Entries, and any queries, should be sent to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Auckland Choral 100th Hallelujahs Documentary

Watch the full documentary of about Auckland Choral's 100th consecutive performance of Handel's Messiah: 

 

Who we are: Get to know some of our choir members

  • Keith Guyan

    Picture of Keith GuyanKeith spent most of his life as a self-employed freelance graphic designer after graduating with a degree in fine arts. Over several further years of study he obtained professional qualifications in advertising, marketing and tertiary teaching, enjoying being a tutor for fifteen years introducing graphic design to young students, then seven years as a part-time senior lecturer in graphic design at AUT University. He has been a self-taught church organist from the age of thirteen, and since 2002 he has been the Parish Elder, Administrator and Organist in the large multicultural Onehunga Co-operating Parish. His love of singing, church and organ music was nurtured from an early age in a musical family. Since 1980 he has sung Bass in Auckland Choral, conducted by Ray Wilson, Peter Watts, Professor Uwe Grodd and many other inspiring and talented musicians. To quote from Hallelujahs & History  “...for bass Keith Guyan, Auckland Choral has everything: thrilling repertoire, inspiring conductor, friendly and caring singers, satisfying discipline, high musical standards and the privilege of performing some of the masterpieces of choral writing”.

     
  • Becky O'Gram

    Picture of Becky O'GramMy earliest memories of singing were car songs, where my sisters and I were squashed in the back of the car while my mother lead the chorus from the front. I started singing in small groups and choirs at age 12 for church events and friends' weddings. I've been a member of some form of choir ever since and now count myself very lucky to be a member of Auckland Choral. I joined in January 2017, with my first concert being the huge St John Passion by Bach. We performed it at the Holy Trinity Cathedral, in German! Singing out that first loud "Herr" gave me goose bumps and was an unforgettable experience. In December that year I got to perform in the Messiah for the first time and hope to do the same every Christmas for a long time to come.

     
  • Tom Bishop

    Picture of Tom BishopTom Bishop was born in Australia, but has spent more than half of the time since out of it. He started choral singing at the age of nine in the fourth grade, where his teacher, a tall, elegant “confirmed bachelor” embraced new methods of education, which mostly consisted of allowing the class to run wild, but managed somehow to hold onto the idea of discipline enough to conduct the School Choir. In addition to singing, he also mangled the clarinet. Since then he has sung in high school, at University, at work, for work, in his spare time, and in less likely venues such as showers, streets and supermarkets, sometimes to the amazement and annoyance of partners, his children, and random passers-by. More formally, he has sung with the Yale Glee Club, the Cleveland Orchestra Chorus, and the Cleveland Early Music Singers, and has been fortunate to work with conductors such as Fenno Heath, Robert Shaw, Pierre Boulez, Richard Hickox, Simon Rattle, and Christoph von Dohnanyi, as well as Uwe Grodd. In his non-singing time, he teaches at the University of Auckland, where he lectures principally on Shakespeare and Drama. He is pleased to be a Tenor 1 because it means he gets a break at auditions.

     
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